Mental Toughness Racing Uncategorized

The letter I wrote to myself – and its powerful effect

The biggest, or should I put it like this; the most important race and the finale of the UAE cycling season, was just around the corner. It’s not the hardest race due to its shorter distance of 75K and pretty much completely flat, but it is an important race to me as in previous years we have seen some rather generous prizes; prizes that potentially could make a significant difference to me.

One week prior to this race, and upon my return from the Danish Championships, I was suddenly faced with fatigue. Day after day I struggled to hit my training targets, I found every training session extremely tough, I bonked before completing my intervals, I got demotivated and worried.

The week leading up to the race, my coach ordered me off the bike, 5 days completely off. Don’t touch your bike! I am not sure if I have ever spent 5 days off the bike. The days went by, and I had no idea how I felt, other than increasingly feeling more and more lazy and lethargic. The night before race night arrived; I asked boss (my coach): “Boss, please can I take my bike out to see how I feel?” – The answer was simple and clear: “No”. Okay, I got a little upset, I felt I needed some clarification on how I was feeling. But I listened. I trusted. I had to.

On the 5th day off the bike, the day of the race, I was lying on my couch with me feet up and hydrating on coconut water. I was unbothered, my vision a bit blurred, I had a mild form of headache, my body felt heavy and switched off. I had zero ‘go-get-attitude’. No fire. Adrenalin vanished. I wasn’t really sure what to do with myself. I got worried about myself, just 7 hours before the race.

3 days prior to race day, and in the middle of my time off the bike, I had been fortunate to be invited to share my journey on a podcast episode (this will be launched on iTunes July/August 16). I was interviewed by two amazing coaches (coaches in peak performance, life and nutrition) and after we had finished the podcast recording, I confided in them and revealed my worries for race day. I shared my current mental state of mind.

I took away 2 tips that were going to prove to help me completely change my mind set! Thank you Pivotal Mind.

1. There is no such thing as ‘try’. You do or you don’t.
2. Yes, you might feel like this, but……. (create positive outcome)…

So here I was, on my couch, 7 hours before the race, where I was ‘trying’ to create these sentences in my head. But they were not sticking. They were not really convincing. The thoughts by themselves didn’t seem to be powerful enough. I had to go deeper.

I then wrote a letter to myself:

(for those of you following my journey on snapchat, you saw me write this letter).

letter to self2

I read the letter to myself over and over again. I had to convince myself. I had to change my mind set. I wanted to change my mindset.

Here is what happened as we took off from the start line in the dark at 10:30pm and headed out on our 1st lap, 2nd lap, 3rd lap and all the way until I crossed the finish line:

I felt EXACTLY like I had outlined it in my letter! EXACTLY! Nothing could take this away from me. As I settled into the race, I knew I had everything in me that day to perform to my best ability, mentally and physically.

Of course, in cycling racing we are never in full control ourselves; unforeseen external factors, punctures, crashes, mechanical breakdowns, other riders’ actions or mistakes, or even other people on the course, spectators, volunteers etc. they can all have an impact on us. An impact that we are not in control of and that simply can bring us either good luck or bad luck. That’s cycling racing! And every cycle racer will go through the whole cycle.

On that night, I fully believed in my strength. I fully believed in the benefits from resting. I fully believed in my control of myself. I fully believed in my preparation. I fully believed in my coach’s advice. I fully believed in my skill. And I fully believed I had worked hard enough to deserve this. From within myself, every piece of the puzzle was in the right place. That one last piece would be down to good luck or bad luck.

I am an amateur cyclist, I didn’t win the World Championships. I am not the best cyclist in the world, not even close.

However, none of that matters. What matters is The Power of Positive Thinking.

Snapchat = hellebve

NAS finish line

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Mental Toughness Road Cycling Ultra Cycling Uncategorized

Everesting: Gloom and Misery

I only decided, spontaneously, in the same week to give it a go, to hook onto someone else’s Everesting attempt. The timing wasn’t super great; I had family visiting and for personal reasons, at the same time, I felt rather emotionally drained. The night before, I confirmed my attendance and organized my bottles, fuel, clothing, lights and chargers to last me most of 20-24 hours. Honestly, I wasn’t much up for it and that was also why I didn’t tell a single soul that I was heading out to potentially complete one of cycling’s toughest challenges. I wanted a ‘bail’ option. I didn’t want any pressure. I gave myself permission to quit at any time.

What is Everesting?

It’s a simple concept, but a fiendishly difficult challenge to complete. Pick any climb, anywhere in the world and ride repeat after grinding repeat until you have notched up 8,848 elevation meters; the height of Mount Everest, in one activity. It is open to anyone, anytime, anywhere. It is not necessarily an organized event. All you need is a bike, a hill, a tracking device and a huge amount of determination.

The rules: One hill / One activity / No sleep / No time limit

Full Everesting rules here https://everesting.cc/

Weather forecast: RAIN

This is the Middle East, the likelihood of rain, is minimal. Although the UAE is made up from mainly desert, we are very fortunate to have some pretty epic mountain climbs too. The chosen climb for this Everesting challenge, was Jebel Jais, hosting the highest point in the UAE, at 1,934m above sea level, with the challenge segment at ca. 24km of 5.4% average gradient. To reach the height of Mount Everest, Jebel Jais had to be climbed just over 7 times.

6am start, right at dawn. It was miserable from the first ascent, wind pushing hard against the bike on certain sections. Followed by an even worse first descent, with rain hammering down; it felt like hail hitting face and skin, riding straight into the raindrops at high-ish speed. As I naively hadn’t respected the weather forecast, I arrived at the bottom of the first descent, in a thin soaked windbreaker and frozen fingers. Although not planned already, I had no choice but to make my first stop at my ‘base camp’. I was cold to the bone, soaked and shivering.

My planned ‘base camp’, was basically my car parked a few hundred meters before the start of the segment. It was my shelter and my fuel station. I changed to a rain jacket, then continued up on ascent number two, still with numb fingers and soaked shoes.The pure misery continued, although of course, as I started climbing again, I got warm and peeled off my layers. The final 4km to the top of the section and top of the mountain, is very exposed hence very windy. It takes a bit of courage and some decent bike handling skills to control the bike both up and down, but nothing more than I couldn’t handle. On the second descent, the roads were wet, but as we have good road conditions in the UAE, I didn’t want to lose time on the descents and it was so cold, I wanted to get down FAST. I nearly swallowed my heart! In one bend, three cars appeared fast on the road in front of me, with the one car coming straight towards me in the wrong lane. He was overtaking on a prohibited overtaking section. I had nowhere to go and no choice but to hit my breaks hard. My back end of the bike skidded left, right, left, right….. I envisaged: either losing control and crashing on the road in front of the car, or taking a hard right turn into the gravel and crashing into the mountain side, to avoid getting hit by the car. Miraculously, I managed to keep the bike upright and narrowly missed the car and the selfish, impatient, irresponsible driver. Breathe!

To bail or to continue?

Heading back to the car, I seriously considered bailing, it was just too miserable and clearly dangerous. It didn’t help by the fact that other riders on the mountain disappeared one by one. I got it! Why ride in miserable conditions, when most days are gorgeous and warm? But then I get stubborn! This is not a valid reason for quitting. A bit of rain shall not stop me. Holding on to the thought I would warm up when making my way up for the 3rd time, I headed back to the car to stuff more cheese sandwiches and snickers in my pockets. The weather must change. It must.

2,000m, 3,000m, 4,000m…. 5,000m. This was my crucial point. Final decision; go home or go all the way. Anything between 5,000m and 8,848m and it is not acceptable to quit; not in my head anyway, then it just turns into wasted effort.

Gloomy Jebel Jais

No turning back

I am healthy, my bike is working and I still have more hydration and fuel in my car. I am pretty organized. Do I even have a valid reason for not completing? The answer is NO. I have no valid reason for not going through with it. Quitting would mean I would have to go back and do this to myself again. No thanks. I am doing it now. Now is now. And I am doing it! I know I can do it. I never doubted it. Of course I can climb until the target is reached. Yes, it’s miserable. Yes, it’s lonely. Yes, it’s cold. Yes, it’s dark. Yes, it’s a mental struggle every time I need to start a new ascent. Yes, it’s hard on the legs, very hard. It’s A LOT of climbing, it’s beyond what I have ever done before. But ultimately, I believe in myself. I came to do it. I am not going home without it. One more factor to push me in the right direction; no woman has ever completed the Everesting Challenge in the Middle East (probably no one ever tried). I will be the first. Determination switch on. No turning back.

Enter the Darkness

By 5,000m of elevation, and riding 100km uphill and 100km downhill, dusk is upon me, just after 18:30. Here comes the darkness, it will be a long, dark and lonely night. The rain stopped a long time ago, the temperatures a bit milder and the wind on the mountain side much less aggressive. I can do this.

By 21:10pm coming down from the top again, I just missed the last food truck, at the 20km viewing point and plateau. It was open on the way up, but closed on the way down. Damn. I had calculated, that to get me through the night, I would need more ‘real food’. I was running out of home made sandwiches. One last truck was in the process of closing, he had only tea, small bags of crisps and cup noodles. Argh, give me all. I sought shelter from the cold wind, warmed up a bit from the boiling water. But that was it. There was no nutrition in that food. Too bad. I have to manage on my own fuel. I will.

By around midnight, going up, again, Jani Brajkovic, former pro rider, came down the mountain side, for the last time. Mission complete. As the only other lonely soul out there, Jani had completed the challenge in around 19 hrs. Now there was only myself left. I still had another 2 ascents to complete.

Sheltering from the cold winds at the top of Jais in the middle of the night. 9 degrees Celcius.

The loneliness of Ultra

It was a very long and lonely night. I was also going slower and slower, and my fuel stops became more inefficient and more time consuming, as I was fumbling around in the back of my car in the darkness, warming up and organizing my re-fuel. As I was ascending for the last time past 3am, all lights on the mountain got turned off. All. And there was no one around. No one. On the way up thunder and lightning started to roar and flash in the distance. Oh no. Please don’t come closer. As I reached the open area, 4 km from the top, the flashes were cutting sharp and came too close. I stopped. The wind pulling me while standing still. I had clocked up ca. 8,600m. I was so close. But not done. I doubted my safety. I pulled out my phone and googled: How likely is it to get hit by a lightning on the top of a mountain? Apparently in the Rocky Mountains it happens a lot. I decided I HAD to complete my challenge. Admittedly, I was frightened. I turned my lights off, swerved to the wrong side of the road and crept up along the mountain wall to blend in with mountain. I couldn’t get to the top (and down again) fast enough. I as reached the top, I had logged 8,818m. Argh, I am still not done. An unexpected loud roaring thunder appeared right above me. Then the rain came. Pouring. It rained hard. I couldn’t see much on the descent. I had also lost my gloves at some point in the night (probably while pulling out a survival snickers), I couldn’t feel my fingers either. I had to check and check again during the descent that my fingers were actually wrapped around the breaks. At the same time I knew I would be able to finish the challenge in under 24 hours, if I got down fast. With the rain came dawn, coming close to 6am. I turned around quick at the segment start, and started my 8th ascent. I needed only 30m elevation more to reach the target of 8,848m. That would be done quick and it was now light. I climbed 1km, 2km, 3km, 4km… The ‘total ascent’ figure on my Garmin didn’t change, it was stuck at 8,818m. No no no no no no! My Garmin 520 Edge took A LOT of water from the downpour and roads splashing on the final descent. It must have frozen. I had no choice but to continue climbing and praying the meters would start to tick. I HAD to reach the Everesting target, otherwise this misery would have been for nothing. Time was moving past 24 hours. Okay what to do. 5km, 6km… elevation meters started to increase again. My target was 9,000m elevation (just to be 100% I had officially covered 8,848m on the actual segment). I reached my target 1/3 of the way up the mountain, after climbing just under 8km up again, for less than 200m extra elevation. Okay, but it’s done! MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

Mission accomplished,

We couldn’t have chosen a worse day. It was pure misery, with unusual winds, rain and just freezing cold on the descents. I continuously kept motivated by reminding myself, that the challenge was made harder by the miserable conditions, and that I would grow stronger from staying with this battle till the end. There was no need to complete a grueling cycling challenge like this, in worse conditions than standard. We could choose any other day. But now was now. I was there. I had started it. And I completed it.

Why do an Everesting?

Honestly, I don’t really know. I just decided to do it. And I saw it through. I get stubborn. When I have it in my head and when I set out to do it, I don’t stop till it’s done. Even my self-approved bail out option didn’t work and the weather misery couldn’t stop me. I think the key is that I believe in myself and my abilities. I know I am physically healthy and I trust that I am strong. The ability to overcome or remove fear contributes too. And so does the sheer determination to complete the mission. The way I looked at it: after all, it is nothing more than to keep going up and down the very same road until the height of Mount Everest has been reached. It is achievable.

Power to the women

Only 175 women world wide have officially completed the Everesting challenge. That accounts for 5% all completions. You can check the Everesting Hall of Fame, to see who completed in your area.

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