Mental Toughness Racing Uncategorized

The letter I wrote to myself – and its powerful effect

The biggest, or should I put it like this; the most important race and the finale of the UAE cycling season, was just around the corner. It’s not the hardest race due to its shorter distance of 75K and pretty much completely flat, but it is an important race to me as in previous years we have seen some rather generous prizes; prizes that potentially could make a significant difference to me.

One week prior to this race, and upon my return from the Danish Championships, I was suddenly faced with fatigue. Day after day I struggled to hit my training targets, I found every training session extremely tough, I bonked before completing my intervals, I got demotivated and worried.

The week leading up to the race, my coach ordered me off the bike, 5 days completely off. Don’t touch your bike! I am not sure if I have ever spent 5 days off the bike. The days went by, and I had no idea how I felt, other than increasingly feeling more and more lazy and lethargic. The night before race night arrived; I asked boss (my coach): “Boss, please can I take my bike out to see how I feel?” – The answer was simple and clear: “No”. Okay, I got a little upset, I felt I needed some clarification on how I was feeling. But I listened. I trusted. I had to.

On the 5th day off the bike, the day of the race, I was lying on my couch with me feet up and hydrating on coconut water. I was unbothered, my vision a bit blurred, I had a mild form of headache, my body felt heavy and switched off. I had zero ‘go-get-attitude’. No fire. Adrenalin vanished. I wasn’t really sure what to do with myself. I got worried about myself, just 7 hours before the race.

3 days prior to race day, and in the middle of my time off the bike, I had been fortunate to be invited to share my journey on a podcast episode (this will be launched on iTunes July/August 16). I was interviewed by two amazing coaches (coaches in peak performance, life and nutrition) and after we had finished the podcast recording, I confided in them and revealed my worries for race day. I shared my current mental state of mind.

I took away 2 tips that were going to prove to help me completely change my mind set! Thank you Pivotal Mind.

1. There is no such thing as ‘try’. You do or you don’t.
2. Yes, you might feel like this, but……. (create positive outcome)…

So here I was, on my couch, 7 hours before the race, where I was ‘trying’ to create these sentences in my head. But they were not sticking. They were not really convincing. The thoughts by themselves didn’t seem to be powerful enough. I had to go deeper.

I then wrote a letter to myself:

(for those of you following my journey on snapchat, you saw me write this letter).

letter to self2

I read the letter to myself over and over again. I had to convince myself. I had to change my mind set. I wanted to change my mindset.

Here is what happened as we took off from the start line in the dark at 10:30pm and headed out on our 1st lap, 2nd lap, 3rd lap and all the way until I crossed the finish line:

I felt EXACTLY like I had outlined it in my letter! EXACTLY! Nothing could take this away from me. As I settled into the race, I knew I had everything in me that day to perform to my best ability, mentally and physically.

Of course, in cycling racing we are never in full control ourselves; unforeseen external factors, punctures, crashes, mechanical breakdowns, other riders’ actions or mistakes, or even other people on the course, spectators, volunteers etc. they can all have an impact on us. An impact that we are not in control of and that simply can bring us either good luck or bad luck. That’s cycling racing! And every cycle racer will go through the whole cycle.

On that night, I fully believed in my strength. I fully believed in the benefits from resting. I fully believed in my control of myself. I fully believed in my preparation. I fully believed in my coach’s advice. I fully believed in my skill. And I fully believed I had worked hard enough to deserve this. From within myself, every piece of the puzzle was in the right place. That one last piece would be down to good luck or bad luck.

I am an amateur cyclist, I didn’t win the World Championships. I am not the best cyclist in the world, not even close.

However, none of that matters. What matters is The Power of Positive Thinking.

Snapchat = hellebve

NAS finish line

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Mental Toughness Racing Travel Uncategorized

‘Something borrowed’ – Danish Nationals 2017, ITT

I wasn’t even meant to take part. I had registered before the deadline to leave the option of participation open. But I had failed to read the rule book of the Danish Cycling Federation and therefore I was oblivious to the paragraph of ‘binding registration’. I decided against participation even before leaving Dubai and after extensive research, when I discovered the practical, logistical and financial efforts and implications of bringing two bikes from the Middle East to a faraway place in Jutland, Denmark, on a solo journey. I accepted and decided against it. And also I have only really started training more specifically on the TT bike four months ago, along with participation in only three ITT events locally during this time. I took off happily from Dubai with my road bike only.

I learnt about the rules of the ‘binding registration’ as well as the extortionate cancellation fee only 48 hours before the start of the ITT event. To be fair, the rules and regulations are there for a reason and I do take full responsibility for not reading them before submitting my registration. Done is done and I accept the consequences. Luckily the consequences were no worse than I was pretty much forced to take part in the ITT Nationals 2017. It could have been a lot worse really.

I considered my options carefully:

1) Roll down the ramp on my road bike, and then exit the course, accepting a DNF.
2) Perform a personal test on my road bike on the ITT course, and finish most likely as the only rider on a road bike and with a potentially ‘embarrassing time’.
3) Perform some sort of max power test, and then exit the course before the finish line, accepting a DNF and avoiding an ‘embarrassing time’.
4) Get hold of a TT bike? (not an easy task this close to the event)

Not yet having made a final decision 24 hours before ‘my start time’, miraculously my friend Svend appeared with an offer to compete on his TT bike. “Take my bike! I am there anyway acting as support for one of the girls. I’ll bring everything for you”, Svend almost demanded, “I have seen all the training you have done. You’ve got this”. The stars somehow aligned.

At the race destination, I met with Svend 2 hours before my start time. Svend pulled out his tool box and adjusted his bike set up as close as possible to my own bike measurements. Not one measurement was correct. But all were within a few centimeters deviation and as I made an easy roll on the bike to collect my start number and back again with a plastic bag in one hand, I decided “yes, it’s going to be okay, it fits okay for 28km”.

I changed back to my road bike and warmed up on the turbo trainer (supplied by Svend). I didn’t ride the TT bike again before I jumped onto it on the start ramp.

Warming up

 

For those of you who do bike racing, you know it’s not an easy task to do alone: drive to destination, find your way, find parking in town via roads that are already closed off, and collect race number in one area and timing chip in another. Go to the loo (at least 3 times), change clothes, set up bike, find tools, buy water, get all stuff organised, eat and drink the right thing at the right time, don’t get too hot, don’t get too cold, warm up (not too early and not too late), stay warm and hydrated on the start line, but don’t carry too much stuff…. Clear the mind and get focused on the task ahead….; the list goes on, and it’s almost impossible to handle this solo and at the same time be fully focused, stress free and perfectly warm for the competition. I have been in this situation countless of times before when travelling alone for competitions. And every time when I have jumped on my bike stressed or cold, I have asked myself the same question: “Why? Why are you putting yourself through this?”.

And here I was again! On all borrowed equipment, set up right before the start of a small event called the Nationals, a competition between the best in the country.

With huge thanks to both Svend and my dear mother, who offered their support from their big hearts, I even managed to fit in a 30 mins warm up on the turbo trainer. Svend supplied the equipment, while my mother unofficially accepted the role as my race assistant. “Mum, I’m running out of water, can you please find some more. Mum, can you please find some tape or cable ties to fit my timing chip. Mum, can you please pull out my vaseline in the right pocket of my sports bag. Mum, can you please add electrolytes to my water bottle. Mum… Mum… Mum… Please… Please… Please…“. Bless my mum. It was her first time being support at a race and I was literally dishing out orders to a clueless helper, while turning my legs on the turbo trainer. It was either that – or start the ITT cold. I cannot thank my mother or Svend enough for their flexibility, patience and generosity.

On another positive note and under the circumstances I was probably the calmest I have been in a long time. No one had any expectations of me. But more importantly, I didn’t have any expectations of myself either. I was out swimming with the big fish, against all odds. The best I could do, was to give the best of myself, on someone else’s equipment. I came into the competition expecting to place last. I would be very happy if I achieved 2nd from the bottom. Let’s not forget I was lining up with the best in the country, incl. 7 World Tour riders.

Off we go

To be honest, I hadn’t even looked at the route in detail (just to make it clear, I would never consider not studying the route under more controlled and competitive circumstances). I heard it was flat with 22 turns. Okay, let’s go! As there was no power meter on the bike, I just received one last minute advice from my faraway coach: “Don’t go too hard in the beginning – and then use your heart rate as a monitor”. I rolled down the ramp and maneuvered out of town behind my personal marshal motor bike. “Don’t go too hard!”… But what does that actually mean? How do you control that ‘feeling’, when you are supposed to give your all, over ca. 45 mins; you have fresh legs and the adrenaline is pumping? I wasn’t sure to be honest. I wasn’t sure of the exact feeling. But I knew I didn’t want to give ‘too little’. I lack experience of my self-awareness.

Just to make you aware that 22 turns, is 22 turns more than what we have on our UAE tracks; NAS, Al Qudra and Al Wathba, where we have zero turns. At home we put the hammer down from start to finish, that’s it. Get measured on raw power. I am not entirely sure how to turn a TT bike efficiently and safely. Again, I lack experience. I decided to take the same line as the motor bike in front of me through every turn. And I decided it would not be worth taking any risks and potentially causing damage to myself or my borrowed equipment. After ca. 10K, I realized and I had to accept that after all I had started too hard. Everything hurt and I was forced to take it down a notch. At this time I was on a long straight, but I only discovered I was on a long straight when I was far enough into it, to realize it was a long straight (lack of preparation). It was quite hard to swallow that I didn’t have full power down the straight (it wouldn’t necessarily make much of a difference to the bottom of the results list, but it would make a difference to my personal performance, judgement of effort and certainly confidence). I was overtaken too. In the UAE I haven’t yet been overtaken (by women). I was totally prepared to get overtaken going into this competition however, but I didn’t know how it would feel, until it happened. I definitely spent some time (and maybe also energy), seconds or minutes, I can’t remember, to deal with it mentally and emotionally. Also around the 10km mark, both my feet started to cramp, like serious pain in both my feet. I had simply tightened my shoes too hard. I don’t know what I was thinking when I was standing in line to the ramp. I always tighten my shoes before I take on a sprint for the finish line. Subconsciously, I tightened my shoes before jumping on the bike. Tight shoes for the best performance. Big mistake. The pain was almost unbearable. I spent a considerable amount of time weighing the two options: 1) loosen both shoes (consequence: a significant drop in speed and momentum) or 2) suck it up and continue riding in pain. I chose the first option as I was coming out of a turn and reached down on both sides. The shoe strings didn’t at all loosen enough. And I still took the loss of speed and momentum. Ah dammit. I’ll have to suck it up then. It’s not an unfamiliar feeling at all. In the Summer heat of Dubai riding dehydrated in 40+ degrees celcius, my feet cramp on a weekly basis. I had to continuously wiggle my toes for the rest of the ITT.  Around 20K and 2/3 into the course, I decided to start picking back up again, hurt more and drive my heart rate higher. There was more technical navigation and another long straight along the way. I did the best I could until the finish line. As I came to a stop, I could hardly unclip from the pain in my feet and I had to take a few minutes on the side, before getting a normal feeling back in the feet and being able to walk again. Quite frankly, I had no idea how I performed. Without a power meter it’s also hard to tell. I wasn’t particularly bothered about the final result, in terms of ranking. If I could have had any form of ‘result’ I would have chosen to see my power profile.

As expected I finished last. Number 20 (of 23 starters and 20 finishers). But you know what? It was not a bad time at all! Under the circumstances, I am quite proud to say I am in the top 20 best time trialists in Denmark in 2017! And I am still in possession of US$ 300 (which would have been the penalty fee for cancelling) minus the penalty for the, also borrowed, non-club kit at US$ 45.

The icing on the cake, was after the event when I caught up with the rider (placing 2nd last) and her coach. Their positive attitude, laughter and healthy delight of beating my time and not placing last in the Nationals, really, it was priceless. Just for that enjoyment factor, I was happy to take the bottom spot in the ranks.

Always happy

After completing ITT Nationals under these circumstances, again I tell myself “No more of this Helle. Come prepared, with the appropriate support and equipment – or stay away”. On the other hand, with the time and effort I put into my cycling, I am equally intrigued to witness what I am actually capable off, under the right circumstances.

Will I return next year? Right now I am thinking: “Probably not for the Elite Nationals. Definitely for the Masters Nationals! (if I can bring my own bike along)”. But I have a habit of throwing myself in the deep end. So who knows.

The day after, Svend earned his title as National Champion Para ITT.

Svend - The Champion

Nothing won, nothing lost… But always an experience richer 🙂

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